Archive for August, 2006

Same Game New Rules. Bill Caskey

Same Game New Rules. Bill Caskey 23 Timeless Principles for Selling and
Negotiating. 2006. ISBN 0975851039. Caskey has been a long time sales
trainer who has had some recent exposure in the high performance sales
podcasts of note. His approach ties in very well with our Integrated
Sales and marketing results. As I find these treasures, I just wish they
had written these books many years ago, so much time so much money that
was missed! This is to me the sales book of the year so far. Our
research/experience validates so much of what he is saying. Deceptively
easy read, and you can tell he comes at things with a coaching
viewpoint. ‘Nuff said, you have to buy it. Cheaper/faster from his
site www.samegamenewrules.com. Good free stuff buried there as well.

Reg Nordman – Managing Partner
Check out our Rocket Readings at

http://rocketbuilders.blogspot.com/

Better products. Better partners. Better sales.

A Business and Its Beliefs. Thomas J. Watson, Jr.

A Business and Its Beliefs. Thomas J. Watson, Jr. The Ideas That Helped
Build IBM. 1963. ISBN 0071418598. Refreshing book full of candor and
self examination, Watson gives you a very good view of what drove IBM
through its largest growth years. The truths are simple, but not easy to
do. Useful to those of you concerned with growth (internal workforce)
culture and corporate responsibility. You feel like you are having a
very friendly and open discussion with the gentleman himself. Easy Read
and pragmatic, it has value in your personal library.

The 86% Solution. Vijay Mahajan & Kamini Banga

The 86% Solution. Vijay Mahajan & Kamini Banga. 2006. ISBN 0131489070.
How to succeed in the biggest market opportunity of the 21st century.
Carrying on with the thesis started by The Fortune at the Bottom of the
Pyramid, this book clearly articulates the incredible opportunities
waiting for us in the developing world. Drawing from real life
experiences and interviews with local and global players, this is a very
good read. Lots of insight into the local adjustments that successful
companies are doing to build very fast growing businesses everywhere but
the developed world. This is an absolute must read if you want to grow
your business more than 10% per year. It is also fascinating to read
about the innovative products coming back to our markets that are
upsetting the NA apple cart! This is just chock a block with
fascinating (to me) “did you know” items.

Everything Bad is Good for You. Steven Johnson.

Everything Bad is Good for You. Steven Johnson.2006. ISBN 1573223077.
How Today’s Popular Culture is Actually Making Us Smarter. A wide
ranging treatise on the impact of popular culture and how it is making
much of our population smarter. So did you know that playing video
games, teaches one that things are hard, that rules are hidden and need
to be found out and that anything worthwhile is worth working for over a
long period of time. Just what do reality TV shows really teach us and
why is that valuable? The Apprentice is way nmore engaging of viewer
talking (blogs and news groups) than Laverne and Shirley ever was. What
about the overall impacts and contributions of Seinfelt, 24 and the
Sopranos to the viewers ability to sort of multiple story lines, complex
plot weaves and reverse twists? Why is Finding Nemo a much more
difficult story than Bambi, yet it is watched and rewatched young and
old alike , and it was built to be that way? Did you know that the IQ
levels of most of our population is rising? That violence in schools is
dropping overall? Ever wonder why many non blockbuster movies from
folks like David Lynch go on to sell heavily to the home libary market?
That some blogs keep TV shows on the air and why? Sim City is the
largest selling video game of all time! If you are the keeper of the
corporate culture at your company, you must read this book. Insight
inito the changing capabilities of your up and coming employees is just
one of the reasons. It is a clear and easy read, that held me in a
death grip of challenged personal reality.